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Author Topic: Rear hub and bearing replacement  (Read 46219 times)
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millsj
Fifth Gear
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Posts: 2575



« on: January 27, 2015, 08:12:26 PM »

After a recent near disaster at the track (see below) when one of my front hubs failed, I have decided to replace the rears as part of my routine maintenance.  The front hubs are pretty straightforward to replace, but the rears are a little more involved and access to a press will make life easier.  Not many people are replacing the rear bearings or hubs, but hopefully this will help someone down the road.



1.   I have ARP wheel studs on the front and wanted them on the rear.  I pressed the old ones out and the new ones in.







2.   Remove the rear tire and knock out the indented part on the axle nut.  I use a drift pin and a hammer to get this done.



3.    Remove the center cap on the wheel and reinstall the tire and drop the car back down to the ground.  Put the car in gear, pull the emergency brake and try to get the axle nut loose.  I sprayed the nut with Kroil several days prior to tackling this job.  My long breaker bar with a long cheater bar was a failure.



Luckily, a 15-20 second burst with my impact wrench with fresh batteries loosened it right up.  Loosen the nut a little, but donít remove the nut yet.

Jack the car back up, remove the tire, brake caliper, pads,  pad bracket and rotor.



5.   Remove the 3 bolts that hold the ABS sensor and wire to the upright and pull the sensor and wire out of the way.





6.   Loosen the nut on the top of the upright, but donít remove it yet.



7.   Remove the lower nut, but donít remove it yet.



8.   Remove the axle nut



9.   I have seen three ways to remove the hub from the upright.  The first way is to use a slide hammer with the upright still attached.  I didnít have a slide hammer, so I went another route.  The second way is to press it out.  I couldnít find good way to support the hub on the press, so I went option number 3.  You will first need to remove the axle from the hub.  I am sure there are other ways to do this, but this worked for me.  Remove the upper upright bolt.  You may need to tap it out with a hammer.



10.   Rotate the upright downward and then put a short piece of 1x1 or similar between the upright and the upper control arm.  The gap creates some space for you to push the axle back toward the diff and out of the hub.



11.   Gently hammer the axle and it should slowly push out of the hub.  DO NOT HAMMER ON THE AXLE WITH TOO MUCH FORCE or you could damage the threads.  You could also reinstall the axle nut so it is flush with the axle and hammer with a little more force.  



12.   Once the axle is free, pivot the hub downward and support it with a piece of wood and place a floor jack under the suspension with a little upward pressure.  





13.   Find a socket or similar that is the same diameter as the hub and hammer it out.  You will probably have to hit on it a little before it comes free, but it will pop out.



14.   The removed hub looks like this.  One of inner bearing races will still be attached to the hub.  You can either separate the two later or ignore if you are replacing both the bearing and hub.



15.   Now remove the lower bolt on the upright.  You may need to tap it with a hammer to get it started.  The upright should now be free.



16.   Remove the clip holding the bearing in place.  Be careful because the clip can launch across the room.



17.   Now you need to remove the bearing from the upright.  This was the biggest headache for me.  The bearing did not want to be set free.  I forgot to take a picture of the final arrangement on the press, but I can show you with two pictures.  I used a piece of pipe (silver) to support the bottom of the bearing/upright.



I used a pipe fitting on the top side of the bearing/upright.  In the picture, the upright is upside down from the correct orientation.  The picture above shows the correct positioning.  Prior to actually getting the bearing to move, I gave it more than a few good hits with a hammer with no affect.  Finally, the press combined with some heat got it to move.  



Once the bearing was flush with the lip on the upright (this will make more sense when you see it in person), I supported the upright like this and pressed the bearing completely out.



18.    Reassembly is the reverse order.  I kept the new bearing in the freezer for a day or so prior to re-installation.  I also heated the upright (where the bearing sits) with my heat gun and then went to work with the press.  The new bearing went in easily.  I placed the old bearing between the new bearing and the press so I would not damage the new one.  This method worked well.  



19.   Reinstall the clip



20.   Press the hub back into the upright.







21.   Reinstall the upright and brake components back onto the car.  I would use anti-seize on the spines of the axle to aid if you ever have to remove again.





It took me a couple of hours to complete one side, but as with most projects, the second side will go a lot quicker.
I am all ears of anyone has any other helpful hints.  I have only done one of the rears, but will be tackling the other one soon.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2015, 08:22:21 PM by millsj » Logged

FM full intake, FM DP and Exhaust, AFCO Shocks (550/400 lb springs), FM O2 Modifier, Hallman MBC with in-cabin controller, Stewart-Warner Boost Gauge, HDHCDD with Harness Bar, RB 1.125" Front Sway Bar, E-bay Delta Fin 27x7x2.5 FMIC, Ultra-Shield Rally Sport seats, Carbotech XP-12/10 pads, SS Brake Lines, PLX DM-100 Multi-Gauge, FM Crossflow Radiator, Spal Fans, FM Oil Cooler, custom in-dash oil pressure warning LEDS, i-Shift LED shift lights, 15x9 bronze 6UL track tires, COT NASCAR wing, DIY front splitter, fully ducted radiator.
chance91
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OK!


« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2015, 09:21:47 AM »

Nice write up.  You even have the same press as I do.

Few things.  For removal of the axle, if you are concerned about damaging the threads, my method is to screw the nut back onto the axle, then put the socket onto the axle nut, and hit on the socket.  Alternative is a punch that fits into the hole in the axle.  On my MSM it wasn't hard, but I've had some cars where the axle is thoroughly stuck to the hub.

Second, they make bearing/race install/removal sets that make the press work a snap. But like you, I had to get pretty creative to get it apart.

Redline makes a synthetic grease "CV-2" that some use in their bearings/CVs.  I've been using this on all my bearings for a while as an added measure.

As well, the inner race stuck to the hub can be a headache.  I've done about a dozen in the last year, and run into this over and over.  Dremel or die grinder is the easiest method, coupled with heat.  But even with heat it usually goes back to the dremel.  Just mind not cutting the hub.

Lastly, anti-sieze on the axle/hub/wheel etc will help save headaches down the line, though hopefully this is a one time deal.

Nice write-up, looks like you have a nice workspace for it too.
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millsj
Fifth Gear
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Posts: 2575



« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2015, 12:10:45 PM »

Thanks for the tips.  I have used Redline grease in the front, but just left the OEM grease in the rears.  They have lasted 10 years with many thousand track miles, so I left well enough alone.  This wasn't a terrible job, but not one that I would want to do often. 

I don't use the press very often, but there is nothing like having the right tool for the job.  I can't complain about the garage space. I am very lucky in that aspect.   afro
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FM full intake, FM DP and Exhaust, AFCO Shocks (550/400 lb springs), FM O2 Modifier, Hallman MBC with in-cabin controller, Stewart-Warner Boost Gauge, HDHCDD with Harness Bar, RB 1.125" Front Sway Bar, E-bay Delta Fin 27x7x2.5 FMIC, Ultra-Shield Rally Sport seats, Carbotech XP-12/10 pads, SS Brake Lines, PLX DM-100 Multi-Gauge, FM Crossflow Radiator, Spal Fans, FM Oil Cooler, custom in-dash oil pressure warning LEDS, i-Shift LED shift lights, 15x9 bronze 6UL track tires, COT NASCAR wing, DIY front splitter, fully ducted radiator.
darkcambria
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Posts: 243


« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2015, 12:49:47 PM »

Great write up. I would concur that a metal hammer on the axel is not optimal. I've used a brass punch with metal hammer that worked nicely and does not damage the end of the axel. Also have had to use an air hammer for a particularly stubborn axel as well. The last time I used a large deadblow which was enough force to get it out but would damage the deadblow before the axel.

I have mine apart for ARP studs right now as well. Glad for the extra reference.
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